The first chapter of of mice and men in his film version of the book essay

The two are fleeing from their previous employment as workmen in Weed, California where Lennie was accused of attempted rape when he touched and held onto a young woman Moira Harris and her red dress, prompted by his love of stroking soft things. George and Lennie escape and travel to Soledad, which is near the ranch where they have work. While walking, George catches Lennie petting a dead mouse that he had accidentally killed.

The first chapter of of mice and men in his film version of the book essay

Both men carry blanket rolls — called bindles — on their shoulders. The smaller, wiry man is George Milton. The two are on their way to a ranch where they can get temporary work, and George warns Lennie not to say anything when they arrive.

Because Lennie forgets things very quickly, George must make him repeat even the simplest instructions. Lennie also likes to pet soft things. In his pocket, he has a dead mouse which George confiscates and throws into the weeds beyond the pond.

As they get ready to eat and sleep for the night, Lennie asks George to repeat their dream of having their own ranch where Lennie will be able to tend rabbits. George does so and then warns Lennie that, if anything bad happens, Lennie is to come back to this spot and hide in the brush.

The first chapter of of mice and men in his film version of the book essay

Before George falls asleep, Lennie tells him they must have many rabbits of various colors. Analysis Steinbeck accomplishes a number of goals in the first chapter of his story. All of this is accomplished with great economy and careful attention to word choices and repetition.

When the story opens, for example, the setting is a few miles south of Soledad, California, near the Salinas River.

Of Mice and Men Chapter 1 Summary

The novel has six scenes chaptersand each begins with a setting that is described in much the same way that a stage setting is described. All the action in this scene occurs in this one spot, much like a stage setting.

Quick Answer His friend Ed Ricketts shaped Steinbeck's thinking about man's place in the universe.

After the main action in the scene, the focus pulls away from the action, preparing the reader for the next scene. In the first chapter, for example, when the characters settle down to sleep for the night, the focus pulls away from the men to the dimming coal of their campfire, to the hills, and finally to the sycamore leaves that "whispered in the little night breeze.

The setting in this novel contains the "golden foothill slopes" and the "strong and rocky Gabilan Mountains. The rabbits, lizards, and herons are out in this peaceful setting. The only signs of man are a worn footpath beaten hard by boys going swimming and tramps looking for a campsite, piles of ashes made by many fires, and a limb "worn smooth by men who have sat on it.

Their physical portrayal emphasizes both their similarities and their individuality.

Of Mice and Men - Wikipedia

They both wear similar clothes and carry blanket rolls, and the larger man imitates the smaller. But they are more dissimilar than they are alike: One is huge and shapeless; the other small and carefully defined.

The first chapter of of mice and men in his film version of the book essay

Lennie, the larger man, lumbers along heavily like a bear; George is small and has slender arms and small hands.

The men also react differently to the pond: Lennie practically immerses himself in the water, snorting it up and drinking in long, greedy gulps. He fills his hat and puts it on his head, letting the water trickle merrily down his shoulders. George, on the other hand, is more cautious, wondering about the quality of the water before he drinks a small sample.

Continued on next pageGet free homework help on Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes.

Form and Content in Of Mice and Men

John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a parable about what it means to be human. Steinbeck accomplishes a number of goals in the first chapter of his story. He sets the . Themes within the first chapter of Of Mice And Men The novel Of Mice And Men by John Steinbeck was written during a period in history when life was not very auspicious.

It was the time of the depression, which followed The Wall Street Crash. A Comparison of John Steinbeck's novel Of Mice and Men and the Film Version of the Novel Looking at the novel 'Of Mice and Men' by John Steinbeck there is the clear comparison that this is a print text, while the film version of the novel by Milestone is a visual text.

Early in the novel, when Lennie likes to pet soft things, Steinbeck is using what technique?

Get free homework help on Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes. John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is a parable about what it means to be human.

Of Mice and Men is a American period drama film based on John Steinbeck's novella of the same name. Directed and produced by Gary Sinise, the film features Sinise as George Milton, alongside John Malkovich as Lennie Small, with Casey Siemaszko as Curley, John Terry as Slim, Ray Walston as Candy, Joe Morton as Crooks, and Sherilyn Fenn as Curley's wife.

In essence, Of Mice and Men is as much a story about the nature of human dreams and aspirations and the forces that work against them as it is the story of two men. Humans give meaning to their lives — and to their futures — by creating dreams.

Summary of Of Mice and Men Chapter 2 - GCSE English - Marked by benjaminpohle.com